Symmetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index in the young

Posted from: http://www.ashjournal.com/article/S1933-1711(16)30224-8/abstract?rss=yes

A new tremendous explanation regarding heart health.

The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the symmetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index (s-AASI) have been shown to correlate to arterial stiffness in adults. This study assesses these indices with anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measures in children. A total of 102 children at a pediatric hypertension clinic who had ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) done from 2009 to 2013 were included (75% males, 7-22yo, 47% hypertensive, 24% prehypertensive, and 34% white-coat hypertensives).

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Safe Exercise for Heart Disease

Posted from: http://www.lisanelsonrd.com/safe-exercise-heart-disease/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss

An innovative cool assessment on the subject of heart health.

ID-100339844Exercise is beneficial for everyone, even those who have heart disease or have had a heart attack. Regular exercise can strengthen your heart, promote quicker recovery, and reduce dependence on medication.
 
Heart benefits of exercise include:

  • Lower blood pressure
  • Increased HDL cholesterol levels
  • Reduced triglycerides
  • Decreased LDL cholesterol levels
  • Reduced symptoms of heart failure
  • Improved circulation
  • Stronger heart muscle
  • Blood sugar control
  • Weight loss
  • Reduced angina

However, you do need to be cautious before starting an exercise routine if you have heart disease or have had a heart attack.

Discuss with your doctor first

It’s especially important to discuss exercise with your doctor if you recently had a heart attack, are experiencing chest pain/pressure or shortness of breath, have diabetes, or recently had a heart procedure.

Some questions to ask your doctor include…

  • What activities can I do?
  • Are sit ups, pushups, and other activities that strain muscles safe?
  • Can I do heavy lifting?
  • What intensity of exercise is safe (ie what heart rate should I aim for while exercising)?
  • How much exercise is okay?
  • Is it safe to walk, jog, run uphill?
  • Am I taking any medications that may interfere with exercise?
  • Do I need to adjust my medication schedule around exercise?
  • Do I need to monitor my pulse while exercising?
  • If I have adverse symptoms while exercising, what action should I take?

There is a chance, your doctor may opt to complete a stress test and/or electrocardiogram before clearing you for exercise.

You may be eligible for a cardiac rehabilitation program. Discuss with your doctor and obtain a referral if applicable.

General exercise tips

Don’t jump into a new exercise program. Take it slow and gradually build up to a full exercise routine. Give your body plenty of time to rest as you get started.

Avoid exercising outdoors in temperature extremes, such as too hot, too cold, or too humid. Temperature extremes can inhibit circulation, cause breathing difficulty, and chest pain. Excess humidity can cause you to fatigue quickly. During hot seasons, exercise in the morning or evening to avoid the worst of the heat. During cold seasons, utilize indoor facilities for exercise, such as an indoor mall or gym.

Stay hydrated. When exercising you need to drink even if you do not feel thirst. You need extra water if exercising in warm/hot temperatures.

Avoid extremely hot or cold showers and the sauna after exercise. Extreme temperatures can cause extra work for the heart.

If you have fallen out of your exercise routine or had to stop due to travels, illness, weather, etc., slowly work back into your exercise routine. Don’t assume you’ll be able to work out at the same level you were previously. Gradually increase your exercise level.

Don’t exercise if you are ill or were recently ill. Give your body sufficient time to fully recover before resuming your exercise routine.

 

The post Safe Exercise for Heart Disease appeared first on Lower Cholesterol and Blood Pressure with Lisa Nelson RD.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

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About Hawthorn Berry Extract

Hawthorn extract is a popular herbal medicine in Europe and the USA. It is made from dried leaves, flowers and fruits of hawthorn bushes. Experiments show that the extract is capable of enabling the heart to beat more powerfully and increasing the amount of blood that flows through the heart’s muscles.

A group of Cochrane Researchers looked to berries-10731_640see if hawthorn extract was better than placebo for treating patients with chronic heart failure. They identified 14 randomized control trials that compared the effects of adding hawthorn extract or placebo to conventional therapies. The trials involved a total of 855 patients and the data indicated that hawthorn extract:

  • improved maximal workload,
  • increased exercise tolerance,
  • reduced oxygen consumption by the heart, and
  • reduced shortness of breath and fatigue.

A few people reported mild nausea, dizziness and heart and stomach complaints.

“There is good evidence that, when used alongside conventional therapy, hawthorn extract can bring additional benefits,” says lead researcher Dr Ruoling Guo, who works in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School at the Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, UK.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

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Could Potatoes Be Bad for Blood Pressure?

Yet ANOTHER reason to skip the fries.  So very happy chips make the cut, though!

Eating potatoes 4 or more times a week linked to higher readings in study

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Potatoes are a popular staple of the American diet, but eating too many — whether boiled, baked, mashed or fried — may raise the risk for high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

 Consuming four or more servings of potatoes a week was linked with an increased risk for high blood pressure — 11 percent for baked, boiled or mashed and 17 percent for fried — compared with eating less than one serving a month. Surprisingly, potato chips didn’t appear to increase the risk, the Harvard researchers reported.

“We hope that our study continues the conversation about potatoes and the risk of hypertension and other diseases,” said lead researcher Dr. Lea Borgi, of the renal division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

But one dietitian not involved with the study suggested the blame shouldn’t rest with potatoes, but with the add-ons people put on their spuds — such as sour cream and bacon bits.

For the study, Borgi and her colleagues followed more than 187,000 men and women who took part in three large U.S. studies for more than 20 years. During that time, participants filled out questionnaires about their diet. None of the participants had high blood pressure at the beginning of the study.

Potatoes have what’s called a high glycemic index compared with other vegetables. And, that can trigger a sharp rise in blood sugar, which might explain the findings, Borgi said. The glycemic index measures how carbohydrates raise blood sugar.

Borgi pointed out that this study didn’t prove potatoes cause high blood pressure, only that they seem to be associated with an increased risk.

Nevertheless, the researchers suggested that replacing one serving a day of potatoes with a non-starchy vegetable might lower the risk of high blood pressure.

Because of their high potassium content, potatoes have recently been included as vegetables in the U.S. government’s healthy meals program, the researchers noted.

“Our findings have potentially important public health ramifications, as they don’t support the health benefits of including potatoes in government food programs,” Borgi said.

The report was published May 17 in the journal BMJ.

One nutrition expert said it’s not potatoes that are the problem as much as all the fixings people put on them.

 “The poor potato’s reputation gets dinged again with this study,” said Samantha Heller, a senior clinical nutritionist at New York University Medical Center in New York City.

Potatoes have been a staple in human diets for centuries, long before high blood pressure was the problem it is today, she said.

“Americans ate, on average, close to 50 pounds of potatoes per person in 2013, the bulk of which came from french fries,” Heller said. “As a dietitian, I am not sure I can even classify commercial french fries as potatoes. They have been transformed into sticks of grease, salt, trans fats and who knows what else?” she said.

And while potatoes are a good source of vitamin C, potassium, minerals, energy and fiber (if not peeled), the reality is most Americans eat potatoes coated in salt, slathered in butter or loaded with sour cream, cheese and bacon bits, Heller said.

“It is no wonder that researchers found that high consumption was associated with poor health,” she said.

But potatoes can be a healthy part of a balanced diet, Heller said.

“You can make mashed potatoes with olive oil, nonfat milk or soy milk and add mixed herbs and spices. I do not peel the potatoes and I mix in vegetables, such as sauteed spinach and garlic,” she said.

Baked potatoes are also great with salsa, Heller said.

“But watch portions,” she added. “For example, today’s russet potatoes can be the size of a city bus. Alternate potatoes with other whole grain starches like brown rice or pasta. And remember, only about a quarter of your plate should be taken up with starchy foods.”

Efforts made by HealthDay News to reach the National Potato Council for comment on the study were unsuccessful.

Tips for Healthy Living Video Library

Posted from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/ToolsForYourHeartHealth/Tips-for-Healthy-Living-Video-Library_UCM_450905_SubHomePage.jsp

The American Heart Association offers these videos tips for healthy living with heart disease and stroke.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

Try Sigmaceutical Blood Pressure Support today!