The Brain and the Eye – How They Work Together

Posted from: http://discoveryeye.org/the-brain-and-the-eye/

An unusual brilliant commentary with reference to vision health.

The Brain and the Eye

The eye works like a camera. The iris and the pupil control how much light to let into the back of the eye, much like the shutter of a camera. When it is very dark, our pupils get bigger, letting in more light; when it is very bright our irises constrict, letting in very little light.

The lens of the eye, like the lens of a camera, helps us to focus. But just as a camera uses mirrors and other mechanical devices to focus, we rely on eyeglasses and contact lenses to help us to see more clearly.

The focus light rays are then directed to the back of the eye, on to the retina, which acts like the film in a camera. The cells in the retina absorb and convert the light to electrochemical impulses which are transferred along the optic nerve to the brain. The brain is instrumental in helping us see as it translates the image into something we can understand.

The Brain and the Eye

The eye may be small, but it is one of the most amazing parts of your body. To better understand it, it helps to understand the different parts and what they do.

Choroid
A layer with blood vessels that lines the back of the eye and is between the retina (the inner light-sensitive layer that acts like film) and the sclera (the outer white part of the eyeball).

Ciliary Body
The muscle structure behind the iris, which focuses the lens.

Cornea
The very front of the eye that is clear to help focus light into the eye. Corrective laser surgery reshapes the cornea, changing the focus to increase sharpness and/or clarity.

Fovea
The center of the macula which provides the sharp vision.

Iris
The colored part of the eye used to regulate the amount of light entering the eye. Lens focuses light rays onto the retina at the back of the eye. The lens is transparent, and can deteriorate as we age, resulting in the need for reading glasses. Intraocular lenses are used to replace lenses clouded by cataracts.

Macula
The area in the center of retina that contains special light-sensitive cells, allowing us to see fine details clearly in the center of our visual field. The deterioration of the macula can be common as we age, resulting in age related macular degeneration.

Optic Nerve
A bundle of more than a million nerve fibers carrying visual messages from the retina to the brain. Your brain actually controls what you see, since it combines images. Also the images focused on the retina are upside down, so the brain turns images right side up. This reversal of the images Is a lot like what a mirror does in a camera. Glaucoma can result when increase pressure in the eye restricts the flow of impulses to the brain, causing optic nerve damage and makes it difficult to see.

Pupil
The dark center opening in the middle of the iris changes size to adjust for the amount of light available to focus on the retina.

Retina
The nerve layer lining the back of the eye that senses light and creates electrical impulses that are sent through the optic nerve to the brain.

Sclera
The white outer coating of the eyeball.

Vitreous Humor
The clear, gelatinous substance filling the central cavity of the eye.

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Susan DeRemerSusan DeRemer, CFRE
Vice President of Development
Discovery Eye Foundation

The post The Brain and the Eye – How They Work Together appeared first on Discovery Eye Foundation.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

Try Sigmaceutical Lutein Vision Support today!

Zinc Deficiency Linked to Chronic Inflammation in Study

Posted from: http://www.naturaleyecare.com/blog/zinc-deficiency-inflammation/

Another tremendous treatise as regards vision health.

foods high in zincResearchers at Oregon State University found a link between chronic inflammation, immune dysfunction and zinc deficiency. 1 Inflammation is involved in cardiovascular disease and other diseases.

They introduced an inflammation-provoking substance to a human white blood cell culture. This resulted in an increase in the responses of the cytokines interleukin 1beta and interleukin 6.

The researchers conducted a related experiment on aged mice with zinc deficiency. The results were similar: an increase in interleukin 6 gene expression.

Zinc deficiency can be detected in a blood test or a taste test. Nutritional intake is another way to measure it. Approximately 12% of U.S. residents fail to get enough zinc. For seniors age 65 and older, the number is a whopping 40%.2 Seniors tend to ingest less zinc, and are less efficient at absorbing it.

“Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation,” the study concluded.

Zinc is a metal that is needed in very small amounts for human health. The Recommended Daily Allowance for males aged 14 and up is 11 mg/day; non-pregnant/non-lactating women 19 and older, 8 mg/day. Food sources of this mineral include seafood, beef, lamb, wheat germ, spinach, pumpkin seeds, squash seeds, and many types of nuts. Some individuals use zinc for eye diseases such as night blindness (with Vitamin A). Zinc gluconate is the safest supplement because it is low in toxic cadmium.

The post Zinc Deficiency Linked to Chronic Inflammation in Study appeared first on Eye conditions, eye care, & how to support healthy vision naturally.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

Try Sigmaceutical Lutein Vision Support today!

Need An Eye-Healthy Recipe? We’ve Got You Covered!

Posted from: http://www.cargoeyecare.com/need-eye-healthy-recipe-weve-got-covered/

A further high-quality explanation re: vision health.

Need An Eye-Healthy Recipe? We’ve Got You Covered!

Nothing makes us want a fresh spring salad more than chirping birds, blooming flowers, and a pleasant spring breeze. Not only can a good salad refresh your palette, it can benefit your vision as well!

We’re taking advantage of all of our favorite in-season fruits and vegetables this spring to provide you with an eye-healthy recipe you’ll crave year-round!

A Fresh Salad Satisfies More Than Just Your Tastebuds

Many common salad ingredients provide nutrients that are essential to maintaining healthy eyes and vision. Walnuts, almonds, and sunflower seeds are excellent sources of vitamin E and zinc, which help keep your retina healthy. Grapeseed oil is also a good source of vitamin E.

Spinach contains the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin. Not only do these antioxidants protect against macular degeneration, they also absorb blue light, protecting your retina from any damage.

Strawberries, and berries in general for that matter, are a great source of vitamin C and help reduce the risk of eye diseases like cataracts and macular degeneration.Blueberries are especially good for your health, reducing the risk of glaucoma, heart disease and cancer.

Try the recipe below and give your eyes a healthy boost!

Eye-Healthy Spinach And Fruit Salad

Here are the ingredients you’ll need:

  • 3 cups spinach
  • ½ cup blueberries and/or strawberries
  • ¼ cup dried cranberries
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds
  • ¼ cup walnut and/or almond pieces
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • ¼ cup crumbled goat cheese
  • ¼ cup white balsamic vinegar, or to taste
  • ¼ cup maple syrup, or to taste
  • ¼ cup grapeseed oil, or to taste
  • Salt, to taste

Here’s how you make it:
Toss spinach, berries, dried cranberries, sunflower seeds, nuts, feta and goat cheese in a large bowl. Pour the vinegar, syrup and grapeseed oil over the salat one at a time. Toss until evenly coated. Season with salt to taste.

Here’s our inspiration for this eye-healthy salad!

If you want to go the extra mile, eat your salad with a salmon on the side! Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish are great for boosting eye health and protecting against disease.

If you prefer your greens blended, here’s an idea for a delicious smoothie to boost vision health!

A Healthy Diet Makes For Healthy Vision

Your vision and your overall health are intimately connected. A healthy lifestyle, including a healthy diet, protects your eyes from damage and disease.

If you have any healthy recipes to share we’d love to see them in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

Our patients rock!

The post Need An Eye-Healthy Recipe? We’ve Got You Covered! appeared first on Cargo Eye Care of Las Colinas.

Sigmaceutical is passionate about spreading health and strongly advocates the idea of strengthening the body’s defenses against sickness and disease through world class nutritional supplement formulations.

Try Sigmaceutical Lutein Vision Support today!